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Friends of the Inyo eNewsletter

Get monthly updates on what’s happening with the organization and more information on public lands issues in the Eastern Sierra.

ACTION IN THE EASTERN SIERRA

Policy

Join a meaningful,
science-based conversation
about protecting public
lands in the Eastern Sierra.

Exploration

Whether by foot, skis or off-road
vehicle, exploring these lands
is an important part of sharing
the Eastern Sierra’s story.

Stewardship

Partner with local agencies
and fellow Friends of the Inyo
volunteers to maintain trails,
restore habitats and more.

UPDATES ON THE BLOG

Listen to FOI’s Bryan Hatchell talk to KMMT’s John DeMaria about our Upcoming Dark Desert Skies Campout Nov. 6-7 at Conglomerate Mesa

Experience Dark Desert Skies at Conglomerate Mesa with Friends of the Inyo, Nov. 6 – 7 There are just a handful of spaces left for this outing that promises to be an exceptional learning experience under new-moon skies in a non-light-polluted part of the Northern Mojave Desert on Death Valley’s doorstep. Friends of the Inyo’s Dark Desert Skies Campout at Conglomerate Mesa will happen November 6-7, the weekend when Daylight Saving Time comes to an end, which means you will enjoy an extra hour of stargazing. Click on the media player button below to listen to Bryan Hatchell, FOI’s Desert…

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If you want to remember the meaning of the word “bajada,” think of Baja (Lower) California

It’s pronounced “bah-hah-dah” This is our final post for this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which ends this Friday, Oct. 15. Since Sept. 15, when it began, Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is bajada, the feminine form of bajado, the past participle of the verb bajar, which means to descend, go down, take down, or get off, as from a horse. According to Merriam-Webster, a bajada in English means a broad…

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Usually dry, an “arroyo” can flood and become dangerous after a rain!

Even if you can’t trill your r’s, arroyo is a word you should know.  There is just one week left in this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is arroyo, which, according to Merriam-Webster Online, means a watercourse (such as a creek) in an arid region, or a water-carved gully or channel. Wikipedia offers a more nuanced definition,…