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04 Oct: September Stewardship Round-Up by Stewardship Director Alex Ertaud

The aspen leaves are making their annual change from green to orange/yellow/red, electrifying our Eastern Sierra landscape. Sadly, that means the all-important summer stewardship work of our Trail Ambassadors has come to an end. September marked the last month our Trail Ambassadors (TAs) were out and about on the trails of our Eastern Sierra Forest Service lands, from Lone Pine to Bridgeport (a close-to-150-mile stretch of public lands).  Here’s just a bit of what they have been up to during the past several weeks: Lily Emerson closed out the season with a super-successful cleanup at the fourth annual Bridgeport Trails…

Pine Nuts - photo by Leila Issa - Unsplash

01 Oct: Piñón, of which “Pinyon” is a Variant, Can Mean a Pine with Edible Seeds, and the Seed Itself: A Pine Nut!

However you choose to spell it, it’s good for you! National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is piñón, which, in its Anglicized form is spelled “pinyon.” In Spanish, piñón can mean any of various small pines with edible seeds found in western North America, as well as the edible seed of such a pine, according to Merriam-Webster. We all know…

Conglomerate Mesa photo by FOI

28 Sep: If it’s got a flat top like a mesa (Spanish for table) it’s a mesa!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is mesa, which in English means an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less extensive than a plateau, according to Merriam-Webster Online. It is a geological term that comes from the Spanish word for table. An English word sometimes also used for mesa is tableland. An example of a…

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25 Sep: National Public Lands Day 2021

Join the Eastern Sierra Interpretive Association, Alabama Hills Stewardship Group,  Bureau of Land Management,  Friends of the Inyo, and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power on September 25, at 8:30 a.m., for a Public Lands Day event! We will be kicking off the busy fall season in the Alabama Hills (the time of year when these public lands receive the most visitors after the weather has cooled) by getting our hands dirty! We will be cleaning out fire pits, and helping the Bureau of Land Management put in the new designated camping site signs. It will be a…

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24 Sep: Jeffrey Pine Trees Interpretive Hike in Lone Pine with Kayla Browne – 9/24/2021

Join Kayla on this out and back hike starting at the Meysan Lake trailhead and joining the Mt. Whitney National Recreation Trail. The hike will head uphill following Lone Pine Creek where we will learn about the gentle giant known as the Jeffrey Pine. Where: Whitney Portal  (Meysan Lake Trailhead) When: start 9:00am (roughly 1.5 hrs) The Hike: 2.4 mi / Elevation: 325 ft gain, starting at 7,979′ This hike is limited to 12 participants, so RSVP today! About Kayla: After experiencing the beauty of the Eastern Sierra for the first time thru-hiking in 2017, Kayla knew she needed to…

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24 Sep: You say “coyote,” the ancients said “coyotl.”

A Nahuatl Word Hispanicized National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. Today’s word is coyote. This word comes from the Nahuatl, which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan family of languages. Nahuatl is believed to have developed in Central Mexico and spread northward to the Southwestern United States, and Southward to Central America. “Coyotl” is what the Nahua people called this animal, which is considered a “trickster” by various…

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22 Sep: Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Fire Burn and ‘Caldera’ Bubble!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the original meanings of just a few nature or conservation terms that have made their way from Spanish into English. Caldera is the Spanish word for cauldron or boiler. It has been adopted into English as a geological term that, according to the National Geographic Online Resource Library (nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia), means a large depression formed when a volcano erupts and collapses. The main difference between a caldera and a crater is twofold: Craters are formed by…

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18 Sep: Bridgeport Trails Day

  Celebrate the end of summer at the Fourth Annual Bridgeport Trails Day! Join us and the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest to get out and give back to the places you love to enjoy. Meet at the Virginia Lakes Trail head parking lot at 8:30am on Saturday, September 18th for a fun morning of trail work and lakeshore clean-up. Bring sunscreen, closed-toed shoes, hat, and water and snacks for a morning of work. Social distancing and mask wearing will be required; be sure to bring a mask! We’ll provide the gloves, trash-grabbers, and trash bags. We will be capping this event…

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17 Sep: THE MID-SEPTEMBER 2021 ISSUE OF “EVERY LAST DROP,” THE KEEP LONG VALLEY GREEN COALITION E-NEWSLETTER IS HERE!

In this issue, read about the history of the L.A./Eastern Sierra Water Wars, and how the Keep Long Valley Green Coalition is working to achieve equitable water sharing in the Eastern Sierra, in a column submitted by Friends of the Inyo Executive Director Wendy Schneider, and originally published earlier this month in the Walking Water (walking-water.org) e-newsletter and blog.

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17 Sep: Beavers and Meadows in the Eastern Sierra Interpretive Hike in Bridgeport with Lily Emerson – 9/17/2021

Join Lily on a nice walk in the woods along the Green Creek Trail up to an area of beaver activity. We will discuss the roles beavers play in an ecosystem, how their behavior contributes to mountain meadows, and a brief history of beavers in the Sierra. Where: Green Creek Trailhead (outside of Bridgeport) When: start 10:00am (roughly 2 hrs) The Hike: 2 mi / Elevation: 100 ft gain, starting at 8,000′ This event is now full, please e-mail alex@friendsoftheinyo.org to be added to the waitlist. About Lily: Lily grew up in the rainy Pacific Northwest, learning to enjoy the many wonders…