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Friends of the Inyo eNewsletter

Get monthly updates on what’s happening with the organization and more information on public lands issues in the Eastern Sierra.

ACTION IN THE EASTERN SIERRA

Policy

Join a meaningful,
science-based conversation
about protecting public
lands in the Eastern Sierra.

Exploration

Whether by foot, skis or off-road
vehicle, exploring these lands
is an important part of sharing
the Eastern Sierra’s story.

Stewardship

Partner with local agencies
and fellow Friends of the Inyo
volunteers to maintain trails,
restore habitats and more.

Highlight

ESIA Adventure Series Films
ESIA Adventure Series Films

UPDATES ON THE BLOG

DC Trip to Protect Public Lands

Desert Lands Focus of Washington Visit Last month, the Conservation Lands Foundation sent a coalition of public lands groups to Washington DC. I was fortunate to join, and meet with our congressional offices about public lands. Friends of the Inyo has a long history working to protect the California desert. With recent administrative attacks it was a perfect time to meet with congressional staff and touch on current threats and opportunities. From hearing rooms to hallways to cafeterias, our meetings took place just about everywhere. Our packed three-day agenda consisted of a visit to the Senate building to meet Feinstein…

Narrow Escape from Piute Pass

by Zak Keene, Friends of the Inyo Stewardship Crew Member On the last day in July, Friends of the Inyo’s Stewardship Crew and Trail Ambassadors headed out to Piute Pass, where a recent landslide had covered sections of the trail with debris. The overcast weather, while pleasant for working conditions, caused some trepidation among the crew as to what the rest of the day would look like. Nevertheless, there was work to be done, so we set about leveling the trail tread and moving rocks to prepare for building steps and check dams. After breaking for lunch, we began working…

Wildfire: the New Normal?

by David Wieland, Friends of the Inyo Trail Ambassador One of the great pleasures of backcountry trail work is disconnecting from the world for eight days at a time. News of new policies from Washington, family drama, and notices of late payment must all patiently wait for me to return to cell range. I distinctly remember leaving a project in the summer of 2015. The crew spilled out of the cramped van like a ripped open box of noodles, a cascading mess of torn sweatshirts, dirty hands, and sweaty faces all competing to get in the buffet first. We proudly…