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Friends of the Inyo eNewsletter

Get monthly updates on what’s happening with the organization and more information on public lands issues in the Eastern Sierra.

ACTION IN THE EASTERN SIERRA

Policy

Join a meaningful,
science-based conversation
about protecting public
lands in the Eastern Sierra.

Exploration

Whether by foot, skis or off-road
vehicle, exploring these lands
is an important part of sharing
the Eastern Sierra’s story.

Stewardship

Partner with local agencies
and fellow Friends of the Inyo
volunteers to maintain trails,
restore habitats and more.

Featured Events

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UPDATES ON THE BLOG

HR 1349

HR 1349: The “Wheels Over Wilderness” bill, introduced by Congressman Tom McClintock (R-CA), carves a gaping loophole in the 1964 Wilderness Act. The bill would open America’s 110 million acres of wilderness areas to mountain bikes, an unprecedented assault on wilderness areas across the country. For five decades Congress has resisted efforts to undermine the Wilderness Act by opening wilderness areas to uses that are currently prohibited. These efforts have failed due to strong public support for wilderness. With less than 3% of the land in the continental United States designated as wilderness, there are plenty of lands— including public lands—that…

Conglomerate Mesa Inyo County Supervisors Letter

Conglomerate Mesa On November 14th, the Inyo County Board of Supervisors discussed a letter to the Bureau of Land Managment regarding the Perdito exploratory drilling project at Conglomerate Mesa located in the southern Inyo Mountains north of Highway 190. Over 50 concerned citizens attended the meeting with 20 residents giving oral comments to the Board in opposition to the project. After discussion, the Board modified an existing letter to exclude any support of the project’s four alternatives and simply offered corrections to the BLM regarding omissions from the Environmental Assessment. The comment period for the project closed on Monday, November…

Restoring Oak Creek

In 2007, a massive fire flared up along Oak Creek, just north of Independence in the southern Owens Valley. A catastrophic flood then scoured the creek in 2008, destroying much of the remaining riparian vegetation. Nearly a decade later, the creek is still barely vegetated and unprotected from future floods. We joined the Fort Independence Tribe, the California Native Plants Society, and the Inyo National Forest on December 14 to take a small step toward restoring Oak Creek’s streamside forest. With a troop of 20 volunteers, we worked until sundown and put over 250 locally grown native plants in the…