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Friends of the Inyo eNewsletter

Get monthly updates on what’s happening with the organization and more information on public lands issues in the Eastern Sierra.

ACTION IN THE EASTERN SIERRA

Policy

Join a meaningful,
science-based conversation
about protecting public
lands in the Eastern Sierra.

Exploration

Whether by foot, skis or off-road
vehicle, exploring these lands
is an important part of sharing
the Eastern Sierra’s story.

Stewardship

Partner with local agencies
and fellow Friends of the Inyo
volunteers to maintain trails,
restore habitats and more.

UPDATES ON THE BLOG

The Juniper Newsletter – October 2021

Following a trying summer of wildfires, poor air quality and temporary National Forest closure orders in our state, fall feels like an especially welcome respite this year. In the October Issue of our Juniper E-Newsletter, we present a recap of the work Friends of the Inyo’s Trail Ambassadors did toward the end of the summer to protect and care for the public lands of the Eastern Sierra despite various challenges; a foretaste of fun outdoor events we have coming up this month and next; an update on our campaign to Protect Conglomerate Mesa; an invitation to enjoy our linguistic blog posts in celebration of National Hispanic Heritage…

September Stewardship Round-Up by Stewardship Director Alex Ertaud

The aspen leaves are making their annual change from green to orange/yellow/red, electrifying our Eastern Sierra landscape. Sadly, that means the all-important summer stewardship work of our Trail Ambassadors has come to an end. September marked the last month our Trail Ambassadors (TAs) were out and about on the trails of our Eastern Sierra Forest Service lands, from Lone Pine to Bridgeport (a close-to-150-mile stretch of public lands).  Here’s just a bit of what they have been up to during the past several weeks: Lily Emerson closed out the season with a super-successful cleanup at the fourth annual Bridgeport Trails…

Piñón, of which “Pinyon” is a Variant, Can Mean a Pine with Edible Seeds, and the Seed Itself: A Pine Nut!

However you choose to spell it, it’s good for you! National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is piñón, which, in its Anglicized form is spelled “pinyon.” In Spanish, piñón can mean any of various small pines with edible seeds found in western North America, as well as the edible seed of such a pine, according to Merriam-Webster. We all know…

If it’s got a flat top like a mesa (Spanish for table) it’s a mesa!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is mesa, which in English means an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less extensive than a plateau, according to Merriam-Webster Online. It is a geological term that comes from the Spanish word for table. An English word sometimes also used for mesa is tableland. An example of a…

You say “coyote,” the ancients said “coyotl.”

A Nahuatl Word Hispanicized National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. Today’s word is coyote. This word comes from the Nahuatl, which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan family of languages. Nahuatl is believed to have developed in Central Mexico and spread northward to the Southwestern United States, and Southward to Central America. “Coyotl” is what the Nahua people called this animal, which is considered a “trickster” by various…

Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Fire Burn and ‘Caldera’ Bubble!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the original meanings of just a few nature or conservation terms that have made their way from Spanish into English. Caldera is the Spanish word for cauldron or boiler. It has been adopted into English as a geological term that, according to the National Geographic Online Resource Library (nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia), means a large depression formed when a volcano erupts and collapses. The main difference between a caldera and a crater is twofold: Craters are formed by…