Spanish Media/Outreach

Bajada - Death_Valley_Wash_aerial

If you want to remember the meaning of the word “bajada,” think of Baja (Lower) California

It’s pronounced “bah-hah-dah” This is our final post for this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which ends this Friday, Oct. 15. Since Sept. 15, when it began, Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is bajada, the feminine form of bajado, the past participle of the verb bajar, which means to descend, go down, take down, or get off, as from a horse. According to Merriam-Webster, a bajada in English means a broad…

arroyo by Intricate Explorer (Pexels)

Usually dry, an “arroyo” can flood and become dangerous after a rain!

Even if you can’t trill your r’s, arroyo is a word you should know.  There is just one week left in this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is arroyo, which, according to Merriam-Webster Online, means a watercourse (such as a creek) in an arid region, or a water-carved gully or channel. Wikipedia offers a more nuanced definition,…

Pine Nuts - photo by Leila Issa - Unsplash

Piñón, of which “Pinyon” is a Variant, Can Mean a Pine with Edible Seeds, and the Seed Itself: A Pine Nut!

However you choose to spell it, it’s good for you! National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is piñón, which, in its Anglicized form is spelled “pinyon.” In Spanish, piñón can mean any of various small pines with edible seeds found in western North America, as well as the edible seed of such a pine, according to Merriam-Webster. We all know…

Conglomerate Mesa photo by FOI

If it’s got a flat top like a mesa (Spanish for table) it’s a mesa!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is mesa, which in English means an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less extensive than a plateau, according to Merriam-Webster Online. It is a geological term that comes from the Spanish word for table. An English word sometimes also used for mesa is tableland. An example of a…

Coyote - brett-sayles-6124724

You say “coyote,” the ancients said “coyotl.”

A Nahuatl Word Hispanicized National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. Today’s word is coyote. This word comes from the Nahuatl, which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan family of languages. Nahuatl is believed to have developed in Central Mexico and spread northward to the Southwestern United States, and Southward to Central America. “Coyotl” is what the Nahua people called this animal, which is considered a “trickster” by various…

cauldron

Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Fire Burn and ‘Caldera’ Bubble!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the original meanings of just a few nature or conservation terms that have made their way from Spanish into English. Caldera is the Spanish word for cauldron or boiler. It has been adopted into English as a geological term that, according to the National Geographic Online Resource Library (nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia), means a large depression formed when a volcano erupts and collapses. The main difference between a caldera and a crater is twofold: Craters are formed by…

Life's a Playa

Whether it’s at the edge of the continent or inland, life’s a “playa.”

Inland or not, a “playa” needs two things: water and sand. National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. Playa is one such word. In Spanish, it usually means beach. But according to the Royal Spanish Academy’s website, rae.es, in some South American countries, playa can also mean a flat, wide and clear space intended for specific uses in towns and large-area industries: e.g., playa de estacionamiento means…

Sierra and Mountain Range

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month by Learning Nature and Conservation Words in Spanish that Have Made their Way into the English Language!

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month! National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. We begin with a word that defines the place we call home: Sierra. In Spanish it means both “saw” and “mountain range,” most likely because the peaks of a mountain range resemble the teeth on a saw blade. It is easy to see the relation between sierra and the English word serrated, which means notched or…

Louis Medina Headshot for CLF

Listen to Friends of the Inyo’s Lou Medina tell KMMT Listeners about what’s coming up from FOI in Sept-Oct

In case you missed our Communications Director Lou Medina’s interview with KMMT FM Arts, Culture & Entertainment (ACE) Show Host John DeMaria on September 3, please use our media player to listen to the full interview. You’ll get an update on our backcountry stewardship work done in early August in the Cottonwood Creek Wilderness; learn about volunteering events and outings coming up in September and October; find out about the upcoming issue of our Jeffrey Pine Journal celebrating FOI’s 35th Anniversary, and how you can receive it by becoming an FOI supporting member; hear about our Spanish-language outreach and more….