Spanish Media/Outreach

logotipo NOAA

We’re on the front page of this week’s (11/18/21) issue of El Sol de la Sierra!

Please share with your Spanish-speaking friends and their children in grades 5 – 12 about a great opportunity for junior photographers to detail, in pictures, how climate change has impacted their lives and their environment. Details about this student photo contest from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are in our Spanish-language article. The deadline is Dec. 3.

logotipo NOAA

NOAA Hosts Student Photo Contest on Climate Change – Deadline is December 3!

Contest is open to students in 5th through 12th grades By Louis Medina, FOI Communications Director The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is organizing a photo contest for students in grades five through twelve to improve understanding of how climate change is affecting the western United States. The theme of the contest is “Picture Climate Change” and the new deadline for submitting photos online is December 3 (the original deadline was November 15). NOAA, whose mission is to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans and coasts, share that knowledge and information with others, and conserve and manage…

el sol de la sierra logo

Read Friends of the Inyo’s November Spanish-Language Column in this Week’s El Sol de la Sierra

FOI’s front-page column in this week’s issue of El Sol de la Sierra focuses on indigenous methods of cooking using heated stones by native peoples in North and South America, and Hawaii. Read it online on our blog or pick up a FREE copy in businesses throughout the Eastern Sierra. Please share this news with your Spanish-speaking friends and neighbors.

Bajada - Death_Valley_Wash_aerial

If you want to remember the meaning of the word “bajada,” think of Baja (Lower) California

It’s pronounced “bah-hah-dah” This is our final post for this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which ends this Friday, Oct. 15. Since Sept. 15, when it began, Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is bajada, the feminine form of bajado, the past participle of the verb bajar, which means to descend, go down, take down, or get off, as from a horse. According to Merriam-Webster, a bajada in English means a broad…

arroyo by Intricate Explorer (Pexels)

Usually dry, an “arroyo” can flood and become dangerous after a rain!

Even if you can’t trill your r’s, arroyo is a word you should know.  There is just one week left in this year’s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo has been celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is arroyo, which, according to Merriam-Webster Online, means a watercourse (such as a creek) in an arid region, or a water-carved gully or channel. Wikipedia offers a more nuanced definition,…

Pine Nuts - photo by Leila Issa - Unsplash

Piñón, of which “Pinyon” is a Variant, Can Mean a Pine with Edible Seeds, and the Seed Itself: A Pine Nut!

However you choose to spell it, it’s good for you! National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is piñón, which, in its Anglicized form is spelled “pinyon.” In Spanish, piñón can mean any of various small pines with edible seeds found in western North America, as well as the edible seed of such a pine, according to Merriam-Webster. We all know…

Conglomerate Mesa photo by FOI

If it’s got a flat top like a mesa (Spanish for table) it’s a mesa!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo is celebrating with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words in the nature and conservation arena that have made their way into English. Today’s word is mesa, which in English means an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less extensive than a plateau, according to Merriam-Webster Online. It is a geological term that comes from the Spanish word for table. An English word sometimes also used for mesa is tableland. An example of a…

Coyote - brett-sayles-6124724

You say “coyote,” the ancients said “coyotl.”

A Nahuatl Word Hispanicized National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the meanings of just a few Spanish-language words that have made their way into English. Today’s word is coyote. This word comes from the Nahuatl, which belongs to the Uto-Aztecan family of languages. Nahuatl is believed to have developed in Central Mexico and spread northward to the Southwestern United States, and Southward to Central America. “Coyotl” is what the Nahua people called this animal, which is considered a “trickster” by various…

cauldron

Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Fire Burn and ‘Caldera’ Bubble!

National Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15 through October 15. Friends of the Inyo would like to celebrate with our community by sharing the original meanings of just a few nature or conservation terms that have made their way from Spanish into English. Caldera is the Spanish word for cauldron or boiler. It has been adopted into English as a geological term that, according to the National Geographic Online Resource Library (nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia), means a large depression formed when a volcano erupts and collapses. The main difference between a caldera and a crater is twofold: Craters are formed by…