Louis Medina

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The Juniper Newsletter – September 2021

What do protection of the Sierra Nevada Red Fox; the removal of cattle exclosures in the Cottonwood Creek Wilderness; efforts to protect Conglomerate Mesa and Long Valley from exploratory drilling; an attempt to educate Inyo and Mono Counties’ Spanish-speaking residents about public lands management in the U.S….and volunteer cleanup and restoration events in Bridgeport and the Alabama Hills on back-to-back Saturdays in September, including National Public Lands Day, Sept. 25, have in common? They all align with Friends of the Inyo’s mission and you can read about them—and more!—in this issue of our Juniper E-Newsletter.

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‘Magnificent Seven’ Gave Back Big Time During Volunteer Backcountry Stewardship Week (Aug. 6-9) at Cottonwood Creek

By Lindsay Butcher, Lead Trail Ambassador Flowing southeast from White Mountain Peak, Cottonwood Creek is fed by numerous springs that pop up all the way into the Great Basin Desert. In 2009, as part of the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act signed by President Barack Obama, Cottonwood Creek was designated as a protected Wild and Scenic River (WSR). Today, the creek’s comprehensive management plan is still under development; however, its WSR designation meant no more cattle grazing in the area. From August 6 through 9, Friends of the Inyo set out with a hard-working group of volunteers and Inyo National Forest…

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A Win for the Sierra Nevada Red Fox

By Jora Fogg, Friends of the Inyo Policy Director Sometime soon, National Forest access and smoke conditions permitting, I will head on a multi-day excursion into the High Sierra backcountry to an area where the elusive and rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes necator) has been sighted. I’m especially excited because on September 3rd the Sierra Nevada Red Fox will receive protection under the Federal Endangered Species Act. In 2018 the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released a Species Status Assessment (SSA) Report for the Sierra Nevada Distinct Population Segment. The SSA team represented USFWS biologists, in consultation…

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Listen to FOI’s Bryan Hatchell Help KMMT FM Listeners Understand the Urgency of Protecting Conglomerate Mesa

In case you missed our Desert Policy Associate Bryan Hatchell’s interview with KMMT FM Arts, Culture & Entertainment (ACE) Show Host John DeMaria on August 13, please use the media player below to listen to the full interview. Bryan provides a good education on the natural, cultural and environmental value of Conglomerate Mesa as he appeals to listeners to provide public comments to the Ridgecrest Bureau of Land Management by the August 30, 2021 deadline. After listening to the show, please visit the Protect Conglomerate Mesa Website, ProtectConglomerateMesa.com, and click on our Action Alert to access important information, including our…

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Action Alert Reminder: 2 Weeks Left to Comment to Protect Conglomerate Mesa from Foreign Drilling!

In their next phase of destructive gold exploration, Canadian company K2 Gold, through its subsidiary Mojave Precious Metals, LLC, is proposing to build 2.7 miles of brand-new roads and 1.1 miles of overlanding routes to access 30 different drill sites and drill 120 holes on Conglomerate Mesa. The total impact is estimated to be 12.2 acres, more than 61 times as much as K2 Gold’s previous exploration activities. Comment by August 30th to #ProtectConglomerateMesa from K2 Gold’s proposed mining activity! 

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The Mid-August Issue of “Every Last Drop” the E-Newsletter of the Keep Long Valley Green Coalition is Hot Off the Press!

Read about how Payahuunadu, “the land of flowing water,” turned into the land of swirling dust after the pumping of Owens Valley water resources to an ever-thirsty Los Angeles began more than 100 years ago. Learn from “Manzanar Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust” filmmaker Ann Kaneko about her own discovery moment when, as a third-generation Japanese-American L.A. resident, she learned that the water she drank came from the same region where her parents had been held in an internment camp during World War II. Please help us spread the word.

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Read FOI Communications Director Louis Medina’s Spanish Column in the 8/12 Issue of El Sol de la Sierra

Thanks to a budding partnership with El Sol de la Sierra, the Eastern Sierra’s only Spanish-language weekly newspaper, Friends of the Inyo’s Louis Medina will contribute a monthly column on an ongoing basis, to educate the Spanish-speaking public about FOI’s work, as well as conservation issues in general. This is very much a part of our new Diversity, Equity and Inclusion effort, as we want to engage the entire Eastern Sierra community in the protection and care of our public lands. This month, Louis’ column appears on page 7 of the August 12 issue. Please read and share.

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The Latest Issue of the Conglomerate Mesa Newsletter is Out!

This issue contains the time-sensitive news that the Ridgecrest BLM has announced the opening of a Public Scoping Comment Period for K2 Gold and Mojave Precious Metals’ (MPM) next gold exploration proposal at Conglomerate Mesa. This destructive project proposes miles of new road construction and 120 drill holes in wilderness-like lands. Friends of the Inyo urges you to comment now and stand up for this beloved landscape. Read below for all details and materials to help you make comments. The deadline to comment is August 30th! Don’t wait!

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The Juniper Newsletter – August 2021

In this edition of the Juniper, you will be introduced to first issue of the Keep Long Valley Green Coalition’s new e-mail newsletter, Every Last Drop: Exposés on the L.A./Eastern Sierra Water Wars; an opportunity to make your voice heard in the struggle to Protect Conglomerate Mesa from foreign mining interests; Friends of the Inyo’s new education/outreach efforts to Inyo and Mono counties’ growing Hispanic community (en español); the continuing stewardship and interpretive work of our Trail Ambassadors; and more! Happy reading—and if you like what you read, happy sharing!